DeChaunac
Michigan U-Pick Grapes

A Blue-Black Wine or Jelly Grape
Similar Varieties: Baco, Frontenac, Foch

Dechaunac red wine grape

 

 

red-grape2-s   Ripens Mid September  --  Makes a superior red wine with good, pleasant taste, good tannin and color, also makes a nice rose'.
 

 

redwine-icon  Usage Notes  --  Wine

DeChaunac is frequently used in a blend with other reds. We often blend it with Foch & Baco.

St. Julien Winery makes "Simply Red" which is a typical use of DeChaunac.

One of the best DeChaunac wines I have tasted came from Georgia Winery in Ringold Georgia that we visited in 2006. They made a dry DeChaunac ("Napoleon") that was better than any other Northern DeChaunacs that I have tasted. (Lots of oak!)

Click here for DeChaunac winemaking info .....

 

 

grapeharvest-icon Harvest Notes -

 

Ripening Information for our LAST WEEKEND - October 20, 21 & 22 2017

Dechaunacis mostly gone but you can still dig out a few bushels. Remember the DeChaunac have green trunks and the Frontenac have red trunks. (Some people like to keep them separate)

Click here for a ripening summary and grape prices for the whole vineyard .....

 


 

red-grape2-s  Variety Info --  De Chaunac is a French-American hybrid wine grape variety used to make red wines. It was developed by Albert Seibel circa 1860. It is also known as Seibel 9549 and is a cross of Seibel 5163 and possibly Seibel 793. The grape was named after Adhemar de Chaunac, a pioneer in the Ontario wine industry.

De Chaunac is known to have a very vigorous growth habit and good resistance to powdery mildew and downy mildew. It is grown in varying amounts for wine production across the northeastern side of North America, especially in the winegrowing regions of New York, Pennsylvania, Nova Scotia, Ontario, and other northeastern wine growing areas.

It can be very productive and winter hardy to -15 F (approx. -26 C.). De Chaunac yields a balanced and fruity wine of good quality, with generally low to mild tannin levels.

De Chaunac is a French-American hybrid wine grape variety used to make red wines. It was developed by Albert Seibel circa 1860. It is also known as Seibel 9549 and is a cross of Seibel 5163 and possibly Seibel 793. The grape was named after Adhemar de Chaunac, a pioneer in the Ontario wine industry.

De Chaunac is known to have a very vigorous growth habit and good resistance to powdery mildew and downy mildew. It is grown in varying amounts for wine production across the northeastern side of North America, especially in the winegrowing regions of New York, Pennsylvania, Nova Scotia, Ontario, and other northeastern wine growing areas.

It can be very productive and winter hardy to -15 F (approx. -26 C.). De Chaunac yields a balanced and fruity wine of good quality, with generally low to mild tannin levels.

 


 

questionmark-tiny2  Where are the DeChaunac vines located in the vineyard?

  • Front Half of Rows 51 to 54
  • Front Half of Rows 64 to 67

Each row has about 50 vines.

Why are only the front half of these rows planted with Dechaunac? Originally only rows 51 to 54 were planted and the vines at the end did not grow well (poor drainage, etc.) The ends of these rows were replaced with Frontenac which I thought would do better.

These rows are really "Generic Red Wine" rows as combinations of DeChaunac & Baco make an excellent wine.

Rows 64 to 67 are trained to a "Geneva Double Curtain" trellis, which means there are 2 top wires 4 feet apart (like utility poles) This gives the vines more room to grow. Rows 51 to 54 are trained to a "Single Top Wire Cordon."

 


 

redwineglass-tiny2-s    Where can I Purchase Dechaunac Wine?

Dechaunac is often used in commercial red blends.

"Simply Red" from St. Julien Winery in Michigan is a typical red blend of this style.

Red blends can be usually purchased in Michigan from local wine shops and grocery stores.

Please visit our Winery Locator Page to find wineries which make this kind of wine....

 

Dechaunac red wine grapes